New Surgical Glue Could Render Stitches And Sutures Obsolete

When wounds are quickly and securely closed following injury, healing is faster, risks of infection are minimized, and more serious sustained injury can be prevented. A new type of surgical glue has been created to do that in a fast-acting and reliable manner. It may even change first aid and medical response procedures at car accidents, in combat zones, and at emergency sites.

Once squirted into the wound the MeTro glue is said to behave much like the silicone

Image Source: New Atlas

Fast Forming For Better Wound Healing

MeTro behaves like a silicone sealant, much like those used to create a water seal in bathrooms and other household applications, but it works even faster. Once administered to human tissue, MeTro rapidly forms to gel-like thickness and serves to seal a wound. This action occurs as highly elastic proteins and light sensitive molecules are set after being exposed to UV light. The gel takes just 60 seconds to thicken and solidify, which is vital to blocking out bacteria in urgent situations.

Modifiable For Recovery Times

While MeTro securely remains in contact with the tissue to which it’s applied, it retains some elasticity so it moves with the patient and prevents wounds from reopening. The treatment can also be modified with a degrading enzyme that determines how soon MeTro will begin to breakdown. Whether sealing is required for minutes or months, the gel can be catered to appropriate recovery times.

The MeTro glue is highly elastic allowing the tissue it interacts with to maintain its elasticity

Image Source: New Atlas 

For Use On Difficult To Treat Sites

Northeastern University and Australia’s University of Sydney Researchers responsible for creating MeTro have also shown how it can be used on treatment sites that are otherwise difficult to seal due to exposure to bodily fluids and natural expansion and contraction. The substance shows potential for use on vital areas that are challenging to stitch, suture, or bandage, such as internal organs like the lungs and heart.

As MeTro has been tested successfully on pigs, researchers are now focusing on trials in humans. Will their development render conventional wound healing and closing treatments obsolete? Comment and share your thoughts.

Article Sources

http://www.nydailynews.com
http://newatlas.com

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Camryn Shea
 

Is a longtime business consultant and a writer who loves to read about the Maker Movement that’s been made possible through technology. In her free time, she enjoys antiquing and touring vineyards.

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