New Type Of Steel Offers High Strength, Ductility, And A Lower Price

Usually, higher strength steels provide less ductility, and vice-versa. Materials scientists and engineers continuously look at methods for getting the most of these two qualities within a single alloy. Researchers in China and Taiwan may have gotten closer, as they’ve developed a new metal manufacturing technique that’s said to yield steel that’s both strong and ductile, and also considerably less expensive than many industrial steels used today.

 

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Strong, Ductile, Lower Cost Breakthrough Steel

The new technique has been referred to as deformed and partitioned (D&P). While the researchers have not revealed many specifics of D&P, the process yields a material that can be defined as a “breakthrough steel”, containing 10 percent manganese, 2 percent aluminum, 0.47 percent carbon, and 0.7 percent vanadium. Cold rolling and embedding of metastable austenite grains are also used in the technique, which creates, what researchers call, a highly dislocated martensite matrix. The matrix allows the steel to retain ductility even as strengthening qualities are incorporated.

Image Source: UPI

Five Times Cheaper Than Aerospace And Defense Alloys

Apart from the dual physical advantages to the new steel, the production process is cheaper than that used to create steel grades that are commonly used in aerospace, defense, and other critical applications. The research team claims that their steel costs one fifth the price of production for aerospace and mil-spec steel, while offering the same characteristics of those alloys.

How Will It Impact Industry?

The study detailing the development of the super steel was published in Science on August 24th, 2017. How the technique and the resulting steel will impact the many industries that use comparable alloys is yet to be known.

What do you think of this development? Comment and let us know.

Article Sources

https://phys.org
http://www.firstpost.com
https://www.upi.com
http://science.sciencemag.org

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James Spader
 

Comes from a long line of American manufacturers and small business owners. His passions have always been journalism and World War II history. When not working, he enjoys cooking and competing in amateur chess tournaments.

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